jake-hope-square

Welcome to our Anniversary Blog by resident blogger Jake Hope. Jake will be reading and reviewing all of the past CILIP Carnegie Medal winning books during the anniversary year. We are also asking shadowers to "Adopt a Book" and join in reading and discussing the anniversary titles in their shadowing groups.

Get Involved

24
Feb
2017

Goggle-eyes

Carnegie winner: 1989
Author: Anne Fine

Why it's a great book

Perfect for readers that love real life, family stories with razor sharp humour.

Read Jake's Full Review

20
Feb
2017

Ruby Holler

Carnegie winner: 2002
Author: Sharon Creech

Why it's a great book

The vitality of youth and the experience of the more elderly are brought into union in a fable like sense in a story that maps the way change can exert itself in our lives if we dare to connect with others, allowing them into our lives and, through so doing, arriving at a place of safety and security.

Read Jake's Full Review

17
Feb
2017

The Borrowers

Carnegie winner: 1952
Author: Mary Norton

Why it's a great book

A tale of tiny people that makes a big impression! This richly imaginative fantasy set in the familiar environment of an everyday household provides a sharply focused, warmly humorous lens on the gradual maturation from childhood to adulthood.

Read Jake's Full Review

14
Feb
2017

Dear Nobody

Carnegie winner: 1991
Author: Berlie Doherty

Why it's a great book

Sensitive, lyrical and avoiding any sensation, this is a gripping story that stimulates thinking around the types of choices and the nature of the decision making we face in our lives.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"We have chosen this book because we think it will be interesting and moving to look into the lives and feelings of people in different situations to us as we feel that it is inciteful and thought provoking."

7
Feb
2017

The Family from One End Street

Carnegie winner: 1937
Author: Eve Garnett

Why it's a great book

Inventive and innovative in the way it shone lights on different aspects of society this immensely playful collection of stories set in a single family is affectionate, witty and hugely endearing, a reason why it continues to endure.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"We read the review on the blog and we were really gripped by the wide range of characters and the social context of the time. We are looking forward to seeing how our world and Garnett's has changed and evolved."

4
Feb
2017

A Monster Calls

Carnegie winner: 2012
Author: Patrick Ness

Why it's a great book

A tale of power and poignancy that brings together an impressive selection of stories within stories, exploring their interconnections and the capacity they hold to aid our ability to cope, find catharsis and even resilience for some of the most emotionally complex and sensitive of events.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

This book is adopted by

NDAllstars
North Durham Academy,

Why we chose this book ...

"Amazing many- layered storyline, brilliant illustrations. A modern classic. This book has proved THE most popular with my reading intervention groups and we have almost had students coming to fisticuffs to borrow it! "

2
Feb
2017

The Little White Horse

Carnegie winner: 1946
Author: Elizabeth Goudge

Why it's a great book

This book takes us to a netherworld where aspects of our lives, the types of change and growth we experience, can be measured. Descriptions are lyrical and there is a measured sense of control and wonder on every page.

Read Jake's Full Review

27
Jan
2017

Skellig

Carnegie winner: 1998
Author: David Almond

Why it's a great book

This spiritual novel explores what it is to be alive, to feel awake to the possibility, to the wonders of the world that we exist in. Written with spare lyricism, it’s one that leaves an indelible impression on the minds of readers.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"We're excited to read Skellig as we have heard so much about it!"

24
Jan
2017

The Ghost of Thomas Kempe

Carnegie winner: 1973
Author: Penelope Lively

Why it's a great book

Uncertainty, humour and playful imagination combine to make this a fresh, engaging and entertaining read with profound comments about the nature of memory and of time.

Read Jake's Full Review

20
Jan
2017

The Haunting

Carnegie winner: 1982
Author: Margaret Mahy

Why it's a great book

The 1982 winner of the Carnegie Medal is ideal for readers that enjoy chilling stories with a brooding sense of uncertainty.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"We can't wait to read and discuss this scary sounding book!"

17
Jan
2017

Whispers in the Graveyard

Carnegie winner: 1994
Author: Theresa Breslin

Why it's a great book

Perfect for readers that want to better understand what it feels like to be an outsider and to be misunderstood.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

This book is adopted by

Wrenn Readers
London Road, Northants

Why we chose this book ...

"Looking forward to our shadowing group reading this modern day classic which tells the plight of a young boy who has dyslexia. "

13
Jan
2017

Monsters of Men

Carnegie winner: 2011
Author: Patrick Ness

Why it's a great book

Perfect for readers who like to be actively involved in the narrative measuring characters and decisions against their own sense of right and wrong and enjoying the twists and turns of a swiftly changing and often unexpected plot.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"The Hemel Hempstead School shadowers are big fans of Patrick Ness and the older readers who shadowed in 2011 are keen to introduce our newer members to Monsters of Men. "

9
Jan
2017

Pigeon Post

Carnegie winner: 1936
Author: Arthur Ransome

Why it's a great book

Ideal for readers who want to escape to a carefree, bygone age of adventure and imagination.

Read Jake's Full Review

group-image

Why we chose this book ...

"Corby Business Academy are looking forward to reading Pigeon Post, the winner of the first Carnegie Medal!"